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Home economics

Domestic service and gender in urban southern Africa

By Sacha Hepburn

Home economics
Hardcover

ALSO AVAILABLE IN OTHER FORMATS:

  • eBook

Book Information

  • Format: Hardcover
  • ISBN: 978-1-5261-6202-1
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • Price: £80.00
  • Published Date: August 2022
  • BIC Category: History, Modern History, Sociology: work & labour, Gender studies: women & girls, Later 20th century c 1950 to c 1999, Southern Africa, African history, Zambia, Humanities / 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000, Humanities / African history, Sociology, BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Labor, SOCIAL SCIENCE / Gender Studies, HISTORY / Modern / 20th Century, HISTORY / Africa / South / General, Society & social sciences / Sociology: work & labour, Society & social sciences / Gender studies: women
  • Series: Gender in History

Description

Domestic service has long been one of the largest forms of urban employment across southern Africa. Home economics provides the first comprehensive history of this essential sector in the decades following independence and the end of apartheid. Focusing on Lusaka and drawing wider comparisons, the book traces how Black workers and employers adapted existing models of domestic service as part of broader responses to changing gendered employment patterns, economic decline, and endemic poverty. It reveals how kin-based domestic service gradually displaced wage labour and how women and girl workers came to dominate kin-based and waged domestic service, with profound consequences for labour regulation and worker organising. Theoretically innovative and empirically rich, the book provides essential insights into debates about gender, work, and urban economies that are critical to understanding southern Africa's post-colonial and post-apartheid history.

Contents

Introduction
1 Feminising domestic service
2 Working women and childcare challenges
3 Girl domestic workers' aspirations and frustrations
4 Regulation, protection, and exclusion
5 Collective organising and the limits of unionisation
Conclusion

Bibliography
Index

Author

Sacha Hepburn is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at Birkbeck, University of London

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